What We’re Normally Eating

Loads of you are now back on the training and healthy eating for the new year, and have been asking what we are eating a normal day. As we normally try and log most of our training and diet it would be easier to just take a random day and lay it out. So here they are:

Luke’s

Breakfast 1
4 whole eggs scrambled.
3 slices of back bacon.
150 grams of baby button mushrooms.
all cooked in butter)
Protein shake made with water.

Breakfast 2
2 Raw tomatoes
50 grams of green olives
Quarter pot of full fat hummus
2 Espressos
Handful of cashews

Training
2 hour road ride based on HR zones
Zone 1 = 7%
Zone 2 = 10%
Zone 3 = 15%
Zone 4 = 65%
Zone 5 = 8%

Post training food
Protein shake
2 oranges
chocolate recovery drink


Lunch
200 grams of boiled broccoli
175 grams of pork chops cooked in sesame oil and 5 spice
1 yellow bell pepper cooked with the pork
1 Espressos with MCT oil


Dinner
200 grams chicken breast - roasted
100 grams of cherry tomatoes - roasted
1 large red onion roasted
Spinach salad with mozzarella and balsamic vineger

Snack
Full fat cheddar cheese 4 slices
Table spoon of hummus
10 red grapes
10 almonds

Si's

Breakfast
3-4 Scramble eggs with butter
Smoked salmon  
Half a red grapefruit
Linseeds
Multivitamin
Double espresso with coconut oil
Ton of water

Snack
Almonds/Brazils

Lunch
Spicy Chicken
Roasted peppers. courgettes and aubergine
More coffee

Training - (running/cycling)
1-2 hours
Zone 4-5 where necessary
1-2 Flapjacks

Post exercise recovery shake
Turkish Lahmacun if it's been a tough session!

Dinner
A stack of Chilli con carne (no rice)
Fresh fruit
Glass of red wine

As you can see it’s nothing too dramatic. We’re not too concerned about calories, but mainly the quality of food we eat when we’re hungry. The main thing to take from this is we avoid refined sugar, wheat and make up our calories with good quality fats. If you’re trying to make a start on eating healthier and losing some weight just start by cutting out sugar for a week, then start getting rid of the wheat the week after that, you’l be amazed at how quickly start feeling better and losing weight. Or even better and go back and take a look at our old blogs on Ketogenic Eating, and the 30 Day Slow Carb Challenge. Or even better book in for a session where we can take you through it


 

The 30 Day Challenge, 30 Days On – How Fat is Keeping me Lean!

photo 1So after the 30 day challenge I wondered what would be the best way of maintaining my body fat and increasing performance. I wrestled with a couple of ideas and they all seemed to come back to one thing…..Ketogenics! So what is a Ketogenic diet I hear you ask. Well it’s pretty simply a high fat, low carbohydrate diet…..though this doesn’t mean stuffing your face with pasties and deep fried food. This is about getting your carbs through fruits and vegetables, and getting your fats through good sources like olives, oils, animal fats, nuts, seeds.

So how does eating more fat help me maintain and lose weight.

When the liver is low on stored glucose it begins to use fat as a source of energy, this creates things called Ketones, these can then be used for energy around the body. Though to the achieve this the daily intake of carbs can only be around 50 grams per day. Now a massive drop in carbs naturally will reduce the amount of calories that goes into the body for fuel, but that’s where the fat comes in. By increasing the amount of good dietary fats being ingested, the body will be more comfortable. So weight and performance can be maintained without having to constantly count the calories. Also increasing dietary fat and reducing carbs will promote the body to use fat as a predominant source of energy and burn more stored body fat.

The upsides of Ketogenic Diet.

Many people think of being in ketosis as a bad thing, but all it means is that the body is using fat as an energy source. One of the biggest upsides is the reduction of body fat, as fat is being used instead of stored. Research has also shown that Ketones are the organs preferred source of fuel, and have been known to show increased functions. Ketones are shown to improve alertness, concentration, sleep patterns and hormone levels. Also as calories aren’t being massively resrtricted stress hormones remain lower, this means the body will function better day to day and recover better after training. Stress hormones have the affect of making the body catabolic, this means muscle will be used for energy, this is dramatically reduced on a ketogenic diet. With fat being used as a source of fuel this means training volume can have a increase, as you are less restricted by the amount of stored glucose in the  body, meaning training can be more intense and longer. The last massive upside is that dietary fat adds to the flavor of foods, making meals more enjoyable as we all naturally crave fats. This also means you feel fuller for longer as the body will have a constant supply of energy.

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The Downsides.

The main downsides are minor effects on lifestyle. When the body becomes ketogenic it doesn’t take much in the way of carbs to take you out if it. Thats why carbs have to be kept to around 50 grams, if you go to far out of ketosis by having to many carbs, the body will begin to store the dietary fats. It also takes some getting used to. I would advice doing the 30 days of slow carb eating first, it will reduce the cravings for complex carbs and make the transition easier.

So how did I go about it?

I wasnt too hard having done the 30 days of slow carb eating. All I had to do to adapt was remove the peas and beans from my diet and replace them with, olives, butter, oils, cream, animal fats, cheese, whole eggs, nuts, seeds, chorizo, ect……pretty easy actually. So my average day would be…….Bacon, eggs, and tomato for breakfast……..spinach, cheese and chorizo stuffed chicken for lunch…..nuts and berries to snack……and lamb bolognese with broccoli, asparagus and parmazan for dinner……it all sounds pretty good hey? Once a week I would then chose to either have a one whole cheat day from midday to midnight, or 2 cheat evenings. This just made socializing on weekends easier and didn’t seem to knock me out of ketosis too much. It also allowed the body to completely replenish stores of glycogen throughout the body that would have been slightly diminished through training. The real secret is to make sure you don’t get your 50 grams of carbs though simple carbohydrates. By getting them though vegetables the body will stay in ketosis and not store fat. Having something starchy or sugary will rise insulin and cause the body to stop burning fat.

So how did I get on.

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30 Day Challenge results:

Weight = 73.6 kg

Chest = 106.5 cm

Waist = 81.5 cm

Body Fat = 10.1%

Now

Weight = 77.9 kg

Chest = 107.5 cm

Waist = 82.5 cm

Body Fat = 10%

So from what you can see is that making a massive increase in my dietary fat I have gained 4.3kg, and still maintained my body fat. This means I have had an increase in lean muscle mass and reserves of stored glycogen. We were a little confused by the 1 cm increase in waist size, but we later work out on the calipers that my obliques and abdominal muscle seemed thicker. This even suprised me, It’s very difficult to increase lean mass and maintain body fat all at the same time. The biggest factor of all was the way I feel……I feel amazing! I’m sleeping better and for sorter amounts of time, my recovery and training has gone through the roof, and I am in better moods and have so much more in the way of concentration and alertness. I thought I felt good after the 30 days, but this has taken it to a whole new level.

The secret is again is not to look at this as a “fad diet”, this is just a lifestyle adaptation. Removing the junk food, getting rid of the stuff that that we didn’t evolve to eat and getting back to eating to what suits our bodies. Over the last 60 or so days I haven’t calorie counted, of worried how big my portions are, and on my cheat days I haven’t felt guilty, and this is because what I have been eating has suited the biology and our bodies. So for those reasons I’m going to keep this going the foreseable future and hopefully all will carry on in the same direction, but will keep you all posted. If you want some advice or fancy having a crack at what I’ve tried book in for a session with us at BourneFit Personal Training or check us out on Facebook and Twitter

Many thanks,

Luke

x

The 30 Day Body Challenge!

So Here I Go!

photo 130 days of eating and living like a saint! (Apart from the cheat days, but we’ll get to that later). What inspired me to do this? Well I’m like most people, I’m brilliant at nailing one aspect of health and fitness at a time. I will be totally on it with training, but will let my nutrition slip with my “oh I’v earned this after today’s training” attitude. Or will have a more relaxed time with exercise, but be eating like a stone aged health guru! So what changed?

After giving clients tips to help with their nutritional plans, I thought “what if I applied everything i’ve ever told my clients, and stuck to it for 30 days?” What’s the potential? What are the limitations? Can it actually be done?…….Well there’s only one way to find out!

 

What’s the plan then?
The goal is to reduce body fat, maintain lean muscle mass, improve fitness, improve recovery from training, and generally feel better. The key thing is to keep it as simple as possible…….A list of rules about nutrition,  some tips to speed the process along, and an exercise plan….easy right? (Famous last words?)

personal training bournemouthSlow Carb eating!

Now you’re all welcome to try this with me, I’ve added a link of what foods are good to start with below. We all know roughly what we should be eating and doing to stay fit and healthy, but I suppose it comes down to one thing “how bad do we want it?”


The rules:

  • Only Slow Carbs – Beans, Legumes, Veggies.
  • No Starchy Foods – Potatoes, Rice, Porridge, Pasta, Bread.
  • No Sugar.
  • No Dairy.
  • Protein in every meal.
  • Don’t drink your calories.
  • Lots of water.
  • Avoid Sauces – Season food with herbs and spices.
  • Breakfast within 30 minutes of waking.
  • No artificial sugar – Diet drinks or sweeteners.
  • Only have fruit after and around training.
  • No Caffeine.
  • Have one cheat day every week.

The tips!

These are a few things that can just help everything along. If you’re already happy with the way you eat, try just using these on their own.

  • Chew everything 20 times before swallowing.
  • 60 seconds of Squats, Push-ups and Bent-over Flys 90 minutes after eating.
  • Ice cold water first thing in the morning.
  • A few nuts 15 minutes before eating main meals.
  • Place an ice pack for 30 minutes on the back of the neck in the evening.
  • Make the last minutes of your shower cold (Sounds horrible I know).
  • Stick something citric in your water.

 

lime

Training

2-3 x 30 minute sessions a week of resistance based training . Either classic weight training or circuit training.

2-3 Aerobic training sessions a week. Around 30-60 minutes either running or biking, and preferable interval based

15 minutes of stretching and posture exercises everyday

Make sure one of your training days falls on your cheat day.

 

I know this might seem like a lot to take in, but when planned out over a week it should be totally maintainable. There is a lot of science related to all of the above, but I’ll explaining all that over the next few weeks (don’t want to bore you all in one go). So this is what the day will plan out like:

8:00:      Wake
8:02:      5 Almonds with Ice cold water with lemon
8:10:      Shower (last minute cold!)
8:15:      Breakfast
10:00:    90 second workout
12:45:    5 Brazil nuts
13:00:    Lunch
15:00:    90 second workout
17:30:    Training (including posture and stretching)
18:15:    Fruit and nuts
18:30:    Dinner
20:30:    90 second workout
20:35:    30 minutes ice pack on the back of the neck
21:30+   Bed

Now depending on your work commitments and training plans your day may look a bit different. So don’t be afraid to tinker with it, and making it work around your day

Personal Training in Bournemouth

So where to start?

If we don’t have a start point, how will we know how we’ve done after 30 days? There are plenty of things to track progress. Weight, measurements, body fat %, clothing size, visual aesthetics, performance, mood, and generally feel. I’ve chosen weight, circumferences, body fat %, a photo (will post that with an “after” photo at the end. Topless photos on the Internet….what would my mother say?!?) and luckily I have a training log so can see how my training is progressing.
So……
Height: 178.5cm
Weight: 78.2kg
Waist: 86cm
Chest: 108cm
Body fat %: 12.9%

I officially started today, so based on the fact I’m writing this I’ve survived the first day so that’s something! Will be keeping you all updated with a diary and will be explaining some of the science and reason behind the plan.

Feel free to join in and keep us updated with how you’re getting on!

GOOD LUCK!!!!

Check out the rest of out articles for more advice on weight loss, fitness and health!

http://www.bourne-fit.co.uk/

http://www.bourne-fit.co.uk/news/what-to-eat-on-the-30-day-body-challenge/

http://www.bourne-fit.co.uk/news/

 

How To Run Faster and Longer.

It’s getting to that time of year when everyone’s brushing the dust of the trainers, and taking to the beach or parks for a run. Running is a brilliant way of improving fitness, aiding weight loss and a great excuse to get off the sofa and out of the house, but everyone always wants to know one thing  “how do I run for longer without stopping?”.

 

Why you stop running?

This comes down to what is know as “the point of muscular fatigue”. This is when you are no longer able to maintain steady and constant muscle contractions, and once this kicks in, the legs start burning, heart rate increase, breathing rate quickens and you eventually stop! When this happens depends on factors like fitness level, speed, incline, energy levels, distance and hydration. Improving  this isn’t just as simple as running until you feel sick! There are techniques to help you run faster for longer!!!

 

Make the most of your arms!

Running isn’t just about your legs, generating power through your arms is key to going for longer. Bend the elbows at 90 degrees and really focus on driving forwards and backwards with your hands. Moving the hands will help generate power with the upper body and core, and give you more power in the legs!

 

Sprint interval training.

These sessions won’t be as long as your normal running session, but will be packed with more intensity! Short hard runs mixed with periods of very slow jogging for rest. For new runners this can be done with 200 meters of sprinting with 45 seconds of slow running for recovery, and then repeat until the end of your set distance. As you get better and feel more confident, begin to increase the sprint distance in 100 meter increments, or keep the intervals the same and increase the overall distance depending on your goals!

 

In the gym!

Building muscle strength in the gym can help when running. Extra leg strength and power means your stride becomes longer! This doesn’t mean you have to stick 200kg on the squat bar and have legs like a bodybuilder. Things as simple as box jumps, lunges and light squats for a few sets of 20 reps, a couple of times a week can add as much as 21% more endurance when running!

 

Getting your longer runs right.

Its good to have a longer run once a week, this will normally be 75-85% of your competitive distance. So if your training for a 10km run, training at 8km will be perfect. For marathon runners your long run would be 17 miles. These runs go hand in hand with intensity though. Going to easy too easy won’t give you the goals you’re after, and going too fast you will burn out before the end. Going at 80% of your fastest pace will get the best results, and still leave you something in the tank for a sprint finish to overtake your friends. 😉

 

Food and Drink.

An hours run on a warm day, you can lose over a liter of sweat! Being dehydrated will affect performance and cause fatigue to kick in sooner! So make sure you have plenty to drink before, after and even during! Your body uses energy from food to keep your muscles going, so remember to eat before and after your run.  It can be tempting to go running on an empty stomach when trying to lose weight, but if you run out of energy you’l have to stop sooner, and if you stop sooner you wont be burning as much fat as if you were still running! Eating properly after training will help recovery, and the sooner and better you recover,the quicker you’l be out running again! Read more on sports nutriton.

 

Don’t forget to take care of yourself! Stretching after training reduces the risk of injury and keeps your body supple. Flexible legs means a longer stride and that means going further! Make sure you listen to your body, its not hard for those little aches and pains to get worse. When you do have them, take a break and take it easy. These are normally a sign of going too hard too soon, so remember to ease into your training and slowly progress over time. If your injured, you can’t run! Fact! Read more…on recovery from exercise.

 

So just remember no matter what level your at with the right training and recovery you can improve! So whether training for a 5km fun run or the next London marathon, you’re all runners!!!

 

Sports Nutrition – eating before exercise

What we eat in the lead up to an all important workout or even competition is essential.  A good meal leaves us full of energy that lasts as long as comfortable.  Get the pre training meal wrong and it can be catastrophic.  Here we will look at some theory behind whats best and offer some ideas.

Slow release is best

 

In fact, slow release is best for most of us, most of the time.  Foods releasing energy slowly keep us fuller and more energized on a regular basis.  An hour workout can be quite demanding so sustained release here is essential.

Timing, timing, timing

General advice is a larger meals 3-4 hours before or smaller meals 1-2 hours before exercise.  We also need to consider the content of the meal that has been consumed to how long to leave it.  Higher fat or protein meals take longer to release.  This can be used to our advantage, by adding higher fat or protein foods to pre workout meals, we create a sustained release!

Foods to try

Don’t change anything too drastically, stick to normal choices.  Porridge is perfect in the mornings, though you need an hour or 2 for it to digest.  Your normal lunch or dinner will work just fine. A mix of carbs (rice or vegetables) with protein (meat, fish, beans or eggs) works well.

Add plenty of carbs for energy, but also some protein in there.  Presence of amino acids (small protein units) in the body has a good link to better performance and recovery.

Coffee is also a favourite among many within an hour of training for that extra kick!

In case of emergencies

It’s the final hour,  you are really stuck, sat in meetings all day or in the car grab some fruit juice, dried fruit, or sports drink with plenty of water (and coffee).  This can often be much better than nothing.

It’s kinda personal 

This is a personal thing as to what works best.  It is worth using the guidelines above but experimenting with what food types and timing work the best for you.  Some people prefer a large meal, others can barely stomach a banana, so see be willing to test..

 

We work from BourneFit Personal Training Studio in Bournemouth, offering a professional service including Personal Training, Weight Loss and Sports Massage.  Visit us at www.bourne-fit.co.uk